Menu
Stories

Milwaukee Urban Ecology Blog

Written by Mike Ziegler
Wednesday, 04 September 2013
As the days get shorter and the acorn squash fatter, the rivers of our city will soon be awash in streaks of yellows, oranges, and reds. But if there’s one thing that won’t be waning (at least for me), it’s the itch to be out and active along Milwaukee’s waterways. Do you find yourself in the, ahem, same boat? Then let’s give the Milwaukee River some much deserved autumnal love with the Urban Ecology Center’s Fall Paddling Series!
Written by Lesley Sheridan
Tuesday, 03 September 2013
Throughout history Milwaukee’s rivers have tremendously affected the people of this area. People have relied on these now-urban waterways for food, travel, trade, industry and recreation. But just as Milwaukee’s Magnificent Waters have affected us, our actions and behavior affect the rivers we love and rely on. In 1987, the Milwaukee Estuary was designated an Area of Concern (AOC) by the federal government. The waters of the Estuary are considered impaired as the result of historical modifications like dredging and straightening, and heavy pollutant loads. It is one of forty-three AOC-designated Great Lake watersheds in the U.S. and Canada.
Written by Ken Leinbach
Sunday, 01 September 2013
If I had a car this would be the personalized license plate for me. It is perfect! If more people would only emulate me, the world would be a much better place don't you think? Am I being arrogant? Sure. Pompous? You bet. Conceited? Not in the slightest. Supercilious? Maybe . . . need to look that one up. But am I right? Absolutely! Just to be clear, in case you are taking me seriously the last thing I really want is the world to truly emulate me. I'm as messed up a the best of us — just ask my family or my therapist. It would, however, be nice if a few more people chose to compost. Because when…
Written by Urban Ecology Center
Saturday, 31 August 2013
The High School Outdoor Leader Program is a two-year, environmental career internship for teens who have completed grades 9-10. Outdoor Leaders are trained in 8 areas including education, stewardship, research and community relations. In addition, Outdoor Leaders take two week-long research trips. This year they even organized and ran our 2013 Teen Survival Challenge!
Written by Jeff Veglahn
Friday, 30 August 2013
The topic on the first day of the Urban Ecologists Summer Camp in the Menomonee Valley was insects. The honeybees in our rooftop hive gave the campers a special treat by letting them witness one of the more exciting events in the insect world: a bee swarm, which accompanies the birth of a new queen. This would soon become an experience they wouldn’t forget.
Written by Ken Leinbach
Thursday, 29 August 2013
Eyes closed and hands outstretched in the smooth water, I could feel the wake form from my palms just before the turbulent white foam of the wave. My body was alive with youthful spirit hardly feeling the cold of the 60 degree water and not at all the bodily aches and pains of 50 years of living. It was a great day to be alive!
Written by Anne Reis
Wednesday, 28 August 2013
What do Charles Darwin, Benjamin Franklin and our summer interns have in common? They are CommunityScientists! A Community Scientist is someone who engages in the research process in a non-academic setting. People are often surprised to learn that anyone can participate in our research projects, regardless of their age, background or previous experience. All you need is a passion for the natural environment. Community Science volunteers at the Center work with bats, birds, bugs, frogs and toads, small mammals, snakes, turtles, insects, plants and more!
Written by Willie Karidis
Tuesday, 27 August 2013
I have been working here at Washington Park for three years now and I must say that they have been three of the most memorable years of my life! I've had the opportunity to meet and work with so many wonderful people — our staff, volunteers and community members — as we continue to grow the Washington Park branch into a wonderful destination for all of Milwaukee. Each day we learn a little bit more about the park and the community. And each day we are connecting kids and families to nature. I never think of our work as a job. It is a way of life with priceless benefits measured in kindness, awareness and "aha" moments.
Written by Lainet Garcia-Rivera
Tuesday, 27 August 2013
Along with Community Program Educator Sam Huenink, I had the pleasure of accompanying the Center’s High School Outdoor Leaders on a trip to the Teton Science School in Jackson, Wyoming. I can attest that it was an amazing trip, full of learning and exploration, but I’ll let Patrick, one of our high school participants explain the rest.  Read on for Patrick McLinden's reflection.
Written by Beth Heller
Monday, 26 August 2013
It’s finally ready and YOU are invited to celebrate a beautiful new public gem: The Milwaukee Rotary Centennial Arboretum opens on September 28th, 2013! The journey leading up to this event has been rich with energy, dedication, challenges and vision. Glimpses of this vision began in the early 1990s when a group of neighbors imagined what it would be like to transform Riverside Park into a safer, ecologically robust outdoor classroom. They formed Friends of Riverside Park, which later evolved into the Urban Ecology Center. New park surveys and attendance records now show that within the last year there have been over 125,000 visits from students, families, adults and neighbors to the 15 acres of Riverside Park. The arboretum adds 25 acres…

Upcoming Events

Event Listings

Early Morning Bird Walks (Menomonee Valley)

Menomonee Valley

Tuesday, September 24th

8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

More Details...

ROOT - Riverside Park

Riverside Park

Tuesday, September 24th

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

More Details...

Find event

Connect

Email Sign-Up

Subscribe

* indicates required
Which Emails would you like to receive?

Connect Now

facebook instagram 2018 2 twitter linkedin

Get Involved

Become a member today!

Copyright © 2019 The Urban Ecology Center. Website by Savvy Panda.